Sep 23, 2017 Last Updated 10:33 AM, Sep 22, 2017
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Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife welcomed their second daughter -- August -- to the world on Monday with a post on the leading social network.

As they did with after the birth of their first daughter, Maxima, in late 2015, the couple wrote the girl a letter, but this one spoke of reveling in the wonder of childhood instead of visions of a better world on the horizon.

"You only get to be a child once, so don't spend it worrying too much about the future," said the letter signed by Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan.

"You've got us for that, and we'll do everything we possibly can to make sure the world is a better place for you and all children in your generation."

A Zuckerberg Chan Initiative established by the couple has pledged billions of dollars to improving life for their children's generation with goals such as eliminating disease.

The Facebook co-founder is among billionaires who have vowed to donate most of their wealth to charitable causes.

"With all the advances in science and technology, your generation should live dramatically better lives than ours, and we have a responsibility to do our part to make that happen," the couple wrote, referring back to a letter written to their first daughter after her birth.

"But rather than write about growing up, we want to talk about childhood. The world can be a serious place. That's why it's important to make time to go outside and play."

And, like many parents, they expressed hope their new baby would sleep soundly and take frequent naps.

A man accused of posting blasphemous content to Facebook has been sentenced to death by a court in Pakistan.

Taimoor Raza was convicted after allegedly posting remarks about the Prophet Muhammad, his wives and companions within the site's comments.

The public prosecutor involved said he believed it was the first time the death penalty had been awarded in a case related to social media.

Human rights campaigners have expressed concern.

Facebook itself has yet to comment on the case.

The US firm previously announced in March that it was deploying a team to Pakistan to address the government's concerns about blasphemous content on its service, but added that it still wished to protect "the privacy and rights" of its members.

Pakistan's Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has described blasphemy as being an "unpardonable offence".

Raza's case was heard by an anti-terrorism court in Bahawalpur - about 309 miles (498km) from the capital Islamabad.

His defence lawyer said the 30-year-old had become involved in an argument about Islam on the social network with someone who had turned out to be a counter-terrorism official.

The public prosecutor said the accused had been arrested after playing hate speech and blasphemous material from his phone at a bus stop, following which his handset had been confiscated and analysed.

Raza will be able to appeal against the death penalty at Lahore High Court and then, if required, in Pakistan's Supreme Court.

The Express Tribune, a local newspaper, reported that the verdict came days after a college professor was refused bail in another case involving accusations of blasphemy on social media in Pakistan.

Amnesty International recently published a report critical of Pakistan’s blasphemy laws.

"[They] enable abuse and violate the country's international legal obligations to respect and protect a range of human rights, including freedom of religion or belief and of opinion and expression," it said.

"Once someone is charged, they can be denied bail and face lengthy and unfair trials."

The developments come seven years after a Pakistan court temporarily blocked local access to Facebook after the social network was used to promote a contest to draw images of Prophet Muhammad - an act considered to be offensive by many Muslims.

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has praised a US-based Nigerian woman for running a secret support group on the social media platform where more than one million women discuss issues ranging from health and marriage to work and sex.

The head of the world's largest social networking company met with Lola Omolola, who is based in Chicago, and posted late on Tuesday about Female IN (FIN), which was founded in 2015.

"It's a no-judgment space ... helping end the culture of silence that exists for women in some parts of the world," the 33-year-old billionaire said in a post on his Facebook page.

Zuckerberg, who visited Nigeria last year, said he would be meeting more Facebook group leaders such as Omolola at the first ever Facebook Communities Summit later this month in Chicago.

The summit will help group administrators to "do even more to build community... and common understanding", he added.

In response to Zuckerberg's post, Omolola said Facebook had helped women worldwide to find their voices through the FIN group, and thanked the entrepreneur for "helping me create the world I wish to live in and have my 8 and 10 years old inherit".

Although the FIN group is secret - meaning that only members can invite others to join and view its content - Omolola said in a public video that it aimed to disrupt the status quo and change the landscape in communities where women are not heard.

"I come from a community where lots of the time women have a lot to say, but we have been conditioned and we have been raised to keep silent, because someone is going to get embarrassed by something we say," Omolola said in the video interview with Facebook's diversity director, Maxine Williams.

Nigeria's Senate last year threw out a gender and equality law that pledged to end discrimination in politics, education and employment, protect women's rights and tackle violence against women after lawmakers opposed it on religious grounds.

Women's rights activists said the dismissal showed the government was ignoring the dangers facing Nigerian women, ranging from sexual assault and abduction to forced marriages.

Thirteen years after dropping out of Harvard University to work on Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday finally got his degree -- well, sort of.

Gospel musician, Patience Namadingo is giving three of his fans the chance to dine with him.

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