Sep 19, 2017 Last Updated 8:40 AM, Sep 19, 2017
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For the third consecutive weekend "The Hitman’s Bodyguard" was the top film in North American box offices, but the cinematic scene remained deep in the summer doldrums, website Exhibitor Relations reported Sunday.

The US Labor Day weekend was shaping up to be the worst in 17 years, industry watchers said, noting the lack of any major new releases. But Lionsgate's "Hitman" managed to take in an estimated $10.3 million(R133.33 million) for the Friday-to-Sunday period, the only movie this summer to cling to the top for three straight weeks. 

The action comedy, starring Ryan Reynolds as a bodyguard protecting a notorious hitman (Samuel L. Jackson), outperformed Warner Bros.'s horror film "Annabelle: Creation" for the second straight week.

"Annabelle," part of the popular "Conjuring" franchise of movies, took in $7.3 million, giving it a shot at passing the $100 million mark domestically, website boxofficemojo said.

Crime thriller "Wind River" from Weinstein Co. came in third, taking in an estimated $5.9 million, up from the previous week's $4.4 million. It stars Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen as federal agents trying to solve a murder on an Indian reservation.

In fourth, also from the Weinstein brothers, was the animated family picture "Leap!" about a young orphan, voiced by Elle Fanning, who dreams of becoming a ballet dancer in 19th century Paris. It netted $4.9 million.

Staying steady at fifth was Steven Soderbergh's droll action film "Logan Lucky," which for the second straight week netted $4.4 million. It stars Channing Tatum, Adam Driver and Riley Keough in an unconventional heist comedy set at a NASCAR race in North Carolina.

Rounding out the top 10 were:

"Dunkirk" ($4.1 million)

"Spider-Man: Homecoming" ($3.7 million)

"The Emoji Movie" ($2.5 million)

"Despicable Me 3" ($2.4 million)

"Girls Trip" ($2.3 million)

Jennifer Lawrence has said the leaking of nude photos of her left her feeling "blindsided".

Intimate images of the Oscar-winning actress were published online in 2014. 

She told Vogue: "I think people saw [the hacking] for what it was, which was a sex crime, but that feeling, I haven't been able to get rid of it.

"Having your privacy violated constantly isn't a problem if you're perfect. But if you're human, it's terrifying."

She added: "When my publicist calls me, I'm like, 'Oh, my God, what is it?' Even when it's nothing. I'm always waiting to get blindsided again.

"It's scary when you feel the whole world judges you."

The actress is the cover star for US Vogue's prestigious September issue, for which she has been photographed by Annie Leibovitz and Inez & Vinoodh.

Vogue also commissioned artist John Currin to paint her for one of the four covers as part of the celebrations for the magazine's 125th anniversary issue.

Lawrence also spoke about her relationship with director Darren Aronofsky, who she's been dating for the past year.

The pair met while filming her new movie Mother!, which Aronofsky directs, and became an item shortly after.

"When I saw the movie, I was reminded all over again how brilliant he is," Lawrence said of the 48-year-old.

"For the past year, I've been dealing with him as just a human.

"I normally don't like Harvard people, because they can't go two minutes without mentioning that they went to Harvard. He's not like that."

The actress also explained that filming Mother! - a horror drama, about which very few details have been revealed - got so intense that she hyperventilated and dislocated a rib.

"I ended up getting on oxygen," she said. "I have oxygen tubes in my nostrils, and Darren's like, 'It was out of focus; we've got to do it again.'"

Lawrence's response to this idea was sadly unprintable, but it's safe to say she wasn't keen on the idea of a reshoot.

R&B singer R Kelly has denied allegations that he is holding several young women in an "abusive cult".

The singer's lawyer said he would work "diligently and forcibly to pursue his accusers and clear his name".

 A Buzzfeed report accuses the singer of brainwashing women, who got closer to him in an effort to boost their musical careers.

Kelly has faced previous accusations of sexual misconduct, but was never found guilty. He denies any wrongdoing.

The report, which quoted three unnamed sets of parents, said they had not seen or spoken with their daughters for months, and that the women, all of them over the age of consent, had their routines controlled by the singer.

That included rules about what they could eat and wear, when to bath and sleep and how to engage in sexual encounters recorded by him, they said.

Three former members of Kelly's inner circle were also interviewed, saying that six women lived in properties managed by the singer in similar conditions.

If they broke the "rules", they said, the women could be punished physically and verbally by the singer, according to to report.

Some of the parents reported their concerns to the police, but the women said they were not being held against their will.

The singer's lawyer, Linda Mensch, said in a statement: "Robert Kelly is both alarmed and disturbed at the recent revelations attributed to him. Mr Kelly unequivocally denies such allegations."

BuzzFeed has said it is standing by its reporting.

In 2008, R Kelly was acquitted of 14 charges of making child pornography after a videotape emerged allegedly showing him having sex with a 14-year-old girl.

Kelly is one of the most successful R&B artists of all time, with 40 million records sold worldwide. His best known his include I Believe I Can Fly and Ignition (Remix).

Charlize Theron has called Hollywood "caveman-like" for so rarely allowing women to direct big-budget films.

"I am ashamed I'm part of an industry that has never allowed a woman to work with a budget higher than what the budget has been on Wonder Woman," the Oscar-winning actress told Variety. 

Directed by Patty Jenkins, Wonder Woman was made for a reported $149m (£116m) and has made $746m (£582m) worldwide.

Theron, 41, also bemoaned the lack of female-driven action films.

Her comments come ahead of the release of Atomic Blonde, in which she stars as a British MI6 agent in 1980s Berlin.

The actress, who won an Oscar after working with Jenkins in Monster, played another action-oriented role in 2015's Mad Max: Fury Road.

Speaking to Variety, though, the South African-born star rued the way the rare female successes in the traditionally male-dominated genre were not capitalised upon.

"We've had moments like this, where women really showcase themselves and kind of break glass ceilings," she said.

"And then we don't sustain it. Or there's one movie that doesn't do well, and all of a sudden, no one wants to make a female-driven film."

Theron sustained various injuries while shooting Atomic Blonde, among them a twisted knee and two cracked teeth.

"It was tough," she said of the film, released in the UK on 9 August. "You want to be in your best fighting shape, and it's hard."

Theron's other films this year include Fast and Furious 8, in which she played a villainous role opposite Vin Diesel and Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson.

Earlier this year Michelle Rodriguez revealed she was considering leaving the action franchise over the way it treated its female characters.

"I hope they decide to show some love to the women of the franchise on the next one," she wrote on Instagram.

Wonder Woman became the most successful live-action film to be directed by a woman last month after exceeding the takings of 2008's Mamma Mia!.

Halle Berry was the first black woman to win the best actress Oscar when she won for Monster's Ball in 2002.

Fifteen years on, she still is the only black woman to have won the award - and she's not happy about it.

Speaking in Cannes last week, the actress said she had been "profoundly hurt" when no black stars were nominated for major acting awards at the 2015 Oscars.

"It was probably one of my lowest professional moments," the 50-year-old told Teen Vogue's Elaine Welteroth. 

The actress said she had thought back to the night she won her Academy Award and thought: "Wow, that moment really meant nothing."

"I was profoundly hurt by that and saddened by that and it inspired me to try to get involved in other ways," she continued.

"Which is why I want to start directing, I want to start producing more [and] I want to start being a part of making more opportunities for people of colour."

On the night in question, Berry dedicated her win to "every nameless, faceless woman of colour who now has a chance because this door has been opened".

Since her victory, though, only four black actresses have been nominated for the best actress Oscar.

They include Viola Davis - winner of this year's best supporting actress Oscar - and Ruth Negga, who was nominated this year for Loving.

Precious star Gabourey Sidibe and Quvenzhane Wallis, the young lead in Beasts of the Southern Wild, were also shortlisted for the best actress award in 2010 and 2013 respectively.

Four nominations in 15 years is hardly something to write home about. Yet it's worth remembering that in the 72 years of Oscar ceremonies before Berry's win, only six black actresses had ever been up for her award.

Two of those nominations came in 1973, when Diana Ross and Cicely Tyson - nominated respectively for Lady Sings the Blues and Sounder - lost out to Cabaret's Liza Minnelli.

Before that the only black actress to come within touching distance of the statuette was Dorothy Dandridge, who was nominated in 1955 in Carmen Jones.

Four black men have won the best actor Oscar since the first ceremony was held in 1929, while nine more have been nominated.

The issue of black representation at the Academy Awards became a matter of public concern in 2015 and 2016, years in which no person of colour was nominated for any of the acting prizes.

This led to the "OscarsSoWhite" campaign and moves by the Academy to make both its membership and nominations more diverse.

So is Berry right to feel aggrieved? We put that question to Sarita Malik, a professor of media, culture and communications at London's Brunel University who specialises in diversity and screen media.

"What Halle Berry says reveals the burden of representation that has historically been placed on black actors, films and representations more widely - the idea these have to deal with the persistent problem of under-representation," she told the BBC.

"Her disappointment has come to characterise our expectations, where we are led to believe that more and better kinds of diverse representation will follow these rare successes.

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