May 21, 2018 Last Updated 8:03 AM, May 21, 2018
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South African anti-apartheid campaigner and former first lady Winnie Madikizela-Mandela has died aged 81.

She and her former husband Nelson Mandela, who were both jailed, were a symbol of the country's anti-apartheid struggle for three decades.

However, in later years her reputation became tainted legally and politically.

Crowds of mourners and political figures flocked to her home in Soweto, in Johannesburg, after news of her death broke.

Family spokesman Victor Dlamini confirmed earlier on Monday that Mrs Mandela "succumbed peacefully in the early hours of Monday afternoon surrounded by her family and loved ones" following a long illness, which had seen her go in and out of hospital since the start of the year.

Mrs Madikizela-Mandela was born in 1936 in the Eastern Cape - then known as Transkei.

She was a trained social worker when she met her future husband in the 1950s. They went on to have two daughters together.

They were married for a total of 38 years, although for almost three decades of that time they were separated due to Mr Mandela's long imprisonment.

It was Mrs Madikizela-Mandela who took his baton after he was jailed for life, becoming an international symbol of resistance to apartheid. She too was jailed for her role in the fight for justice and equality.

To her supporters, she became known affectionately as "Mother of the Nation".

In a televised address President Cyril Ramaphosa - whom Mrs Madikizela-Mandela praised earlier this year - called her as a "voice of defiance" against white-minority rule.

"In the face of exploitation, she was a champion of justice and equality," he said on Monday.

"She as an abiding symbol of the desire of our people to be free".

Retired archbishop and Nobel laureate Desmond Tutu said she was a "defining symbol of the struggle against apartheid".

"Her courageous defiance was deeply inspirational to me, and to generations of activists," he added.

The Malawi government is revealing that it has stationed health personnel in airports and border posts who are screening goods coming into the country in light of the listeria outbreak in South Africa.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO) neighbouring Namibia has reported a confirmed case that might be connected to listeria.

In a statement, the WHO says it has reached out to 16 countries to help with preparedness and response to the listeria outbreak that has killed nearly 200 people since January 2017.

So far there has been 950 confirmed cases in South Africa

Despite an international recall of the products, the WHO says further cases are likely because of listeriosis' potentially long incubation period.

Speaking to Capital FM, Joshua Malango who is Ministry of Health Spokesperson says they are working with the World Health Organisation to ensure there is no prevention.

Meanwhile the Competitions and Fair Trading Commission reveals that they are working with different stakeholders to ensure that there is compliance following a ban effected on all meat products from South Africa.

Two weeks ago, all meat and meat products from South Africa were recalled and removed from shops to prevent the disease.

Listeria is an illness usually caused by eating foods contaminated by the bacteria, listeria monocytogenes.

Listeria is found right throughout the environment. It can be in soil, in water, on people's hands, and can turn up in food.

Babies can be born with listeriosis if their mothers eat contaminated food during pregnancy. The symptoms of the disease include fever, muscle aches, and diarrhoea.

South Africa's former President, Jacob Zuma, is to face prosecution for 18 charges of corruption, the director of public prosecutions has confirmed.

They include more than 700 counts of fraud, racketeering and money laundering. He denies the charges.

Mr Zuma, 75 was forced to resign as president last month by his party, the ruling African National Congress (ANC).

He was facing his ninth no-confidence vote in parliament before he left office.

The charges against Mr Zuma relate to a 30bn rand ($2.5bn; £1.7bn) government arms deal in the late 1990s, before he became president.

Zuma's corruption charges: A brief history

  • First filed in 2005 when Mr Zuma's financial adviser, Schabir Shaik, was jailed for fraud and corruption.
  • Mr Zuma went on trial in 2006 but the case collapsed when the prosecution said it was not ready to proceed more than a year after he was charged.
  • South Africa's National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) controversially dropped the charges in 2009, shortly before he won the presidency.
  • Political opponents campaigned tirelessly for him to face trial.
  • South Africa's High Court reinstated the charges in 2016 and Mr Zuma lost a Supreme Court appeal to overturn them.
  • The country's chief prosecutor, Shaun Abrahams, has now decided to pursue a case against the former president.

Mr Zuma weathered an array of corruption allegations during his nine years in power.

In 2016, a report by South Africa's anti-corruption watchdog alleged that the billionaire Gupta family had exploited their ties with him to win state contracts.

Both the Guptas and Mr Zuma deny any wrongdoing.

A woman has been mauled to death by a lioness at a private game reserve north of South Africa's administrative capital, Pretoria, a local emergency service reports.

Netcare 911 spokesman Nick Dollman said the service had responded to a call of a lioness attack in Hammanskraal town.

"Tragically, the victim had sustained severe injuries and she died at the scene," Mr Dollman said.

It is unclear what led to the attack.

Mr Dollman said that bystanders had tried to revive the victim, identified as a 22-year-old woman, by initiating CPR [cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

He did not identity the private lodge where the attack happened but said it was just outside of the Dinokeng Nature Reserve in Hammanskraal town.

The reserve describes itself as the first free-roaming residential game reserve for the "big five" African animals next to an urbanised area.

Five police officers and a soldier have been shot dead during a raid on their station in South Africa's Eastern Cape province.

In a statement, the South African Government News Agency said three officers were killed instantly.

The off-duty soldier was shot as the assailants fled, taking two other officers hostage. Their bodies were found 6km (4 miles) down the road.

A government statement said both men had been shot "execution style".

The unknown group of armed robbers burst into the police station near Mthatha, and opened fire early on Wednesday morning.

Police do not yet know the motive for the attack. The suspects are believed to have robbed a cash machine shortly before. They took 10 firearms and a police van from the station.

Gen Khehla John Sitole, National Commissioner of the South African Police Service, has vowed to find the killers, saying he was "appalled and deeply saddened by the cold and callous attack".

People on social media have been sharing their dismay at the attack.

One Facebook user, who was a family friend of the soldier killed, said: "An attack to the law enforcement institutions is an attack to the safety and security of our communities.

"This is a shock for the community. We now live in fear. If they can attack the people meant to protect the community‚ who are we? Who will we turn to?"

The BBC's South Africa correspondent Milton Nkosi says that before this attack, research found the killings of police officers had dropped by 52% since the end of apartheid in 1994.

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