Aug 23, 2017 Last Updated 8:04 AM, Aug 23, 2017
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An agriculturalist is suggesting that Malawi adopts the use of Genetically Modified (GMO) maize to deal with pests such as the fall army worm.

The pest invaded fields during the last growing season, destroying crops in their wake.

According to the Agriculture Ministry’s Controller of Agricultural Extension and Technical Services Alfred Changaya, Malawi is still held back from using GMO maize, due to a lack of policies that do not permit the practice.

In an interview with the Malawi News Agency, Changaya cited the example of South Africa where the use of GMO maize has eliminated the stalk borer.

So far the search for a lasting solution to the Fall Army Worm outbreak, which was first reported in Malawi in December 2016, is still underway.

There has however been a longstanding debate on the use of GMO crops in the country.

One of the major criticisms being that as a country we do not have strong regulations and enforcement capacity to monitor the processes.

Researchers believe that despite the criticism, the country is moving forward in terms of commercialising genetically modified crops, with cotton, cowpea and banana now in field trials.

The Biosafety Act was passed in 2002, biosafety regulations in 2007 and the National Biotechnology and Biosafety Policy was enacted in 2008.

Malawi has a fully functional biosafety regulatory committee that deliberates on applications for trials, and a functional biosafety registrar’s office.

These instruments have made it possible for Malawi to progress with trials of three different genetically modified crops, which are now at different stages, as Malawi gears up for commercializing GM crops.

Bt cotton is at the variety registration trial stage, while Bt cowpea is in its second year of confined field trials (CFT) and virus resistant banana is in its first year of CFTs at proof of concept stage.

The trials are being conducted in nine field sites in all the regions of the country, and they are progressing very well.

Farmers are already asking for the seed, but are being made to understand that there has to be a process for the seed to be released to them. However, their hopes are high after being told that if all goes according to plan, the seed will be released in the next three years.

Genetically Modified Crops are plants used in agriculture, the DNA of which has been modified using genetic engineering methods. In most cases, the aim is to introduce a new trait to the plant which does not occur naturally in the species.

Representatives of the Agriculture ministry are revealing that the fall army worms that have hugely affected the Southern African region may affect the final crop estimates.

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